How silencing Asian hate perpetuates racism

Eugene Chung was drafted by the New England Patriots in 1992. Photo: Getty Images

“Well, you’re really not a minority,” Eugene Chung was told in an NFL coaching job interview.

When Eugene Chung, who is a Korean American former NFL offensive lineman and assistant coach, pushed the interviewer on this statement, the interviewer explained that he was “not the right minority” they were looking for.

This short article in ESPN didn’t take up more than a quarter page, nor did it include any graphics. If it weren’t for an online Korean Adoption group I’m part of, I wouldn’t have seen it. …


Seven police officers with a blue background. They are covering their eyes. There are red splatters behind them
Seven police officers with a blue background. They are covering their eyes. There are red splatters behind them

On April 20, at 2:30 pm, people of all races waited for the verdict on the Chauvin trial to be announced. I waited, and around 3:00 the verdict was read.

  • Unintentional second-degree murder- guilty.
  • Third degree murder- guilty.
  • Second-degree manslaughter- guilty.

A police officer being found guilty on all counts is unprecedented. This led the majority of Americans to understand these guilty verdicts as a much needed step towards racial equity; as a sign that the George Floyd protests had created a shift in the public view around racial justice. Large news sources such as NBC and USA Today published…


Back of a female-identified person holding a flower behind her back. She has shoulder length black hair. She is wearing a black and white dress, in front of a background that matches.
Back of a female-identified person holding a flower behind her back. She has shoulder length black hair. She is wearing a black and white dress, in front of a background that matches.

As an infant, I was adopted from Korea and brought to live with my white parents in rural Wisconsin. Growing up in this white community, I was taught the myth of assimilation and colorblindness. While never explicitly stated, I quickly learned to fit in, to not discuss race, and to understand that I was just like everyone else. The belief when I was growing up was that assimilation would keep me from experiencing racism. This belief in assimilation was further perpetuated by friends and adults in my life telling me “I don’t see you as really Asian”, as if to…


Asian adults mourning outside behind flowers. Gold Spa sign in background. One person holding a sign reading “Stop Anti-Asian Hate Crimes”

I woke up on Wednesday morning to this text from a friend, “Morning- If you need someone who will listen, know that I am here.” I thought nothing of it, and assumed this was meant for someone else and wrote back a simple “?”.

I then went to browse the news, and began to see headlines about the Massage Parlor Massacre, Asian Hate Crimes, and the shooting spree in Atlanta. I quickly understood the text.

As more and more news came out, the more I began to see how one dimensional the conversation was becoming. Yes, this was an Asian…


This year I had my first child. He was a healthy 7.5 pounds and had no complications. The first couple of months, my partner and I were your typical new parents: We were sleep deprived, overwhelmed, and trying to adapt to our new normal where this new little person seemed to have complete and utter control over our schedules.

Now, as he reaches four months, things have gotten a bit more comfortable. We have become a family unit and have developed a loose semblance of a schedule. And he is much more fun. He is not quite as terrifyingly tiny…

Hannah Matthys

Hannah Matthys uses her multicultural background as foundation to make Equity Diversity and Inclusion concepts accessible. Learn more here: bebravediversity.com

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